Entries by Agronomy Team

The dirt on soil tests

With soil nutrient levels dropping, how do you need to change your soil-testing program and fertility rates? By Ralph Pearce, CG Production Editor Fewer farmers are sampling their soils. In Ontario, the numbers say fewer than 30 per cent of farmers test every three years, even though this trend is leading to a data gap at […]

Estimating Corn Yield

Early corn yield estimations are a great way to get out into your field and start to predict the yield of different varieties given the growing season. It allows a grower to start making harvest decisions, marketing decisions, and to estimate needed storage capacity. How many spots should I sample from? Generally doing a kernel […]

Estimating Soybean Yield

Calculating soybean yields can be difficult. Plant spacing, soil types, environmental factors, insect and disease stress can all affect the final yield. Pod numbers, seeds per pod, and seed size will all control yield. When do I begin counting? The earliest time to begin yield counts is around R5-R6 stage with the R6 stage being […]

Gibberella Ear Rot in corn

What is it? Gibberella Ear Rot, or Red Ear Rot, is caused by the fungus, Gibberella zeae (Fusarium graminearum). This disease can occur throughout the U.S. Mid-West and Southern Ontario. The pathogen overwinters on corn, wheat and barley debris. Spores produced on the debris lead to infection during silking. Red Ear Rot is more prevalent […]

Ear Rots in Corn

Ear rots can be difficult to control since weather conditions are critical to the disease development. Rots can establish any time after pollination in wounds created by insects, birds, machinery, and even hail. Rainy weather or heavy, prolonged dews often lead to ear rots in these wounded cobs. Why are rots a concern? The direct […]

Stalk rots in corn

The distribution and prevalence of stalk rot diseases vary from year to year. However, the diseases are present in most years even though it may be at low levels. The majority of stalk rot damage in Ontario is caused by three fungi, Anthracnose, Gibberella and Fusarium. However, Diplodia and Pythium have also been observed. Although […]

Managing Fusarium Head Blight at harvest

The less infected kernels that go into storage the better, and the greater of a chance a grower will have for not getting docked to a lower grade of wheat. Combine tips and notes Higher fan speeds are needed to blow infected kernels out the back. Ridgetown College has done studies on fan speeds, and […]

Western Bean Cutworm

Why are they a concern? The western bean cutworm is a damaging pest in corn and dry edible beans. They can cause large yield losses and reduced grain quality. In corn They begin to feed on the tassels and silks until they are large enough to tunnel into the ear and feed extensively on the

Fusarium head blight

What is it? Fusarium Head Blight is a fungal disease that affects the head of small grain crops. Also referred to as Scab, it can affect wheat, barley, oats, rye, corn, and triticale. Wheat and barley are generally the most affected. It is mainly caused by the species Fusarium graminearum, and can cause loss of […]