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DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends

UAN Fertilizers Higher Once Again

OMAHA (DTN) — A majority of retail fertilizer prices continue to push higher, according to fertilizer prices tracked by DTN for the last week of January 2017. This marks the second consecutive week prices have been significantly higher, although prices have been trending higher much longer.

All but one of the eight major fertilizers were higher although only two were higher by any considerable amount. UAN28 was 8% higher compared to a month earlier while UAN32 was 6% more expensive. UAN28 had an average price of $236/ton while UAN32 was at $270/ton.

The remaining five fertilizers were slightly higher but not by a significant amount. MAP had an average price of $448/ton, potash $329/ton, urea $353/ton, 10-34-0 $439/ton and anhydrous $482/ton.

One lone fertilizer is slightly lower, but this move to the low side was not that notable. DAP had an average price of $430/ton.

On a price per pound of nitrogen basis, the average urea price was at $0.39/lb.N, anhydrous $0.29/lb.N, UAN28 $0.42/lb.N and UAN32 $0.42/lb.N.

While retail fertilizer prices may not be as low as they were a few weeks ago, they are still relatively low in the big picture view and university crop budgets continue to reflect this fact.

In a post from the Agricultural Economic Insights’ Blog titled “Why Soybean Acres Aren’t a Clear Winner in 2017” from Feb. 6 and written by David Widmar and Brent Gloy, the ag economists take a look at the different crop budgets from across the Corn Belt. They used crop budgets for the 2017 growing season for corn and soybeans from Iowa State University, the University of Illinois and Purdue University.

The changes in the cost of seed, fertilizer and crop protection from 2016 compared to 2013 are broken down in the post. Scroll down to find the link to this post.

Not surprisingly, fertilizer has seen large declines during this time. Iowa State estimates fertilizer will be down $59/acre in corn and $25/acre in beans while Illinois figured $57/acre less in corn and $42/acre less in beans and Purdue was at $73/acre lower in corn and $44/acre lower in beans.

“While fertilizer expenses have changed in all budgets — as one would expect given declining fertilizer prices — changes in seed and crop protection have also been impactful,” the report said.

While some may believe soybeans would hold a clear economic advantage in the 2017 growing season over corn production, the university crop budgets were not consistent with the assessments of which crop would fare better economically. The Purdue and Illinois crop budgets favored soybeans in 2017, while the Iowa State crop budget favored corn.

Differences in the crop budgets are not uncommon, the report said. It happened in 2014 when the Purdue budgets favored soybeans while Iowa State and Illinois both stated corn would be more profitable.

“When evaluating seed, fertilizer and crop protection expenses across the three university budgets, the adjustments were not consistent,” the report stated. “Inconsistencies in production costs adjustments are also likely common across farms too.”

To read the post and review the results, click on this link: http://bit.ly/…

Retail fertilizers are lower compared to a year earlier. All fertilizers but one are now double-digits lower.

The one fertilizer no longer down double-digits is urea, which is now down 5%. UAN28 is now 10% less expensive while MAP is 11% lower. Both DAP and UAN32 are 12% lower, anhydrous is 13% less expensive, potash is 14% less expensive and 10-34-0 is 20% lower compared to a year prior.

DTN collects roughly 1,700 retail fertilizer bids from 310 retailer locations weekly. Not all fertilizer prices change each week. Prices are subject to change at any time.


Source: DTN, by Russ Quin, DTN Staff Reporter

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London soybean farmers hope to match record set by wheat crop

By John Miner, The London Free Press


After harvesting a record wheat crop earlier this summer, some farmers in the London region are looking at scoring a repeat with soybeans.

“Soybeans are much better than anyone anticipated. Many people in the London area are having record yields,” Peter Johnson, a Southwestern Ontario-based agronomist with Real Agriculture, said Wednesday.

Soybeans are Ontario’s biggest cash crop with sales in 2015 at the farm gate exceeding $1.4 billion. In Middlesex County, soybeans typically bring in more than $100 million a year.

While the London region and much of Southwestern Ontario fared well, it wasn’t the same story in the Niagara Peninsula where it remained dry through most of August. Read more

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Success on Great Lakes phosphorus

wheat seedlings

Can winter wheat get too big?

Source: Wheat School on RealAgriculture.com.


Ontario’s winter wheat crop is growing like gangbusters thanks to unseasonably warm fall temperatures. But could it grow too much?

“No way,” says agronomist Peter Johnson in Real Agriculture’s latest Wheat School episode. “The only thing we have to worry about is if it’s still growing on Christmas Eve, like last year.” In that case growers may have to adjust spring nitrogen rates.

The 2016 wheat crop benefitted greatly from early planting to produce a record 96.7 bushels per acre. Johnson has encouraged growers to plant early again this spring, but many have asked whether plants could get too big as good growing conditions persist.

In this episode, Johnson looks at a fast growing wheat field and concludes that the plants can still add more tillers. He says last year many plants had 10 to 12 tillers and he’s seen nowhere near that number in fields he’s scouted this fall.

“Well advanced wheat in the fall makes you money next spring,” says Johnson. “This is a an awesome crop.”

UnderseededClover

Six limiting factors in your soil that will make or break your operation

Soil, your primary infrastructure

Farms and grazing operations — organic or otherwise — are only as good as their worst resource, according to Oregon-based grazier Abe Collins.

“Soil is our primary infrastructure on the farm,” said Collins, who spoke at the recent Organic Alberta conference.

“Biologically, chemically, and physically, you need to be looking at the limiting factors in your soil.”

In the Canadian Prairies, water tends to be a key limiting factor when it comes to growing crops and forages — but there are others as well, said Collins.

This checklist covers off six other important factors that could mean the difference between success and failure on your farm. While Collins was speaking to an audience of organic producers, there’s plenty of good ideas for conventional growers to borrow too.

1. Year-long green

The first rule, says Collins, is “100 per cent covered soils 100 per cent of the time — never bare soil.

“Bare soil is a burn victim,” he said. 
 Read more

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Thompsons welcomes Rob Wallbridge as Organic Specialist

Blenheim, Ontario, Canada –  July 14, 2016

Thompsons Limited is pleased to announce that Rob Wallbridge has joined the company as Organic Specialist.

Rob grew up on conventional dairy and cash crop farms in Central and Eastern Ontario. He comes to Thompsons with more than 15 years of experience in organic crop certification, production and marketing.

Rob is a registered Certified Crop Advisor (CCA-ON) and is a board member with the Organic Council of Ontario. He is also a volunteer member of both the AAFC Organic Value Chain Roundtable and the Livestock Working Group of the Canadian General Standard Boards’ Organic Technical Committee.

This appointment will help solidify and build Thompsons profile as a major international player in the organics supply chain.

Follow Rob Wallbridge on Twitter.

About Thompsons Limited

Established in 1924, Thompsons was purchased by The Andersons, Inc., and Lansing Trade Group, LLC in 2013. Thompsons is an integrated supplier of value-added agricultural products and services to growers in Ontario, Minnesota and North Dakota and to food processing customers worldwide. Thompsons owns and operates 12 elevators, 11 retail farm centers, 2 seed processing plants, 5 bean processing plants, a wheat processing plant, and 9 certified organic facilities. For more information, visit Thompsons Limited online at www.thompsonslimited.com.


Media Contact:

Dawn Betancourt, President, Thompsons Limited
Phone: (519) 676-5411

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Is it your intention to apply nitrogen in-crop to your corn?

Your farm has several options to consider utilizing this year:

  • Traditional sidedress 28%, perhaps at knee high corn
  • High clearance 28% application at V6 to V8 leaf stage with your own self-propelled applicator using drag hoses, Y-drops or streamer nozzles, or…

Introducing Thompsons NEW high-clearance RoGator for urea application!

Apply in-crop urea at V6 to V8 leaf stage with a self-propelled custom applicator airflow RoGator, owned and operated by Thompsons Limited.

If you consider the following chart, showing the uptake of nitrogen throughout the corn growing season, a significant portion of the nitrogen requirement occurs from tasseling to physiological maturity (black layer).

An in-season, planned, application of nitrogen allows you to more precisely meet the nitrogen requirements of your corn crop. In addition, we now have the ability to test for soil nitrogen, in field!

Nitrogen Update chart

New for 2016

We now have the ability to test for soil nitrogen, right in the field!

Using Thompsons N-Gauge, our 360 SoilScan unit, we will have nitrate results in minutes.

To make the most out of an in-crop application of 28% or urea, it is strongly recommended that the nitrogen be treated with an inhibitor (Agrotain) that protects the nitrogen from ammonia volatilization, denitrification and nitrate leaching.

Contact your local Thompsons branch today.

All that confusion on seed treatments

Some implications of Ontario’s new neonic regulations are stunning.

By Ralph PearceCountry Guide, Production Editor

As the calendar has turned to a new year, the news from seed and chemical companies is that there is considerable confusion about seed-applied treatments. Growers, they’re finding, have been left with a mixed bag of information about the options available to them, much of which is flat out wrong.

Some growers believed they had no seed-applied options at all, while others were confused about the levels of neonicotinoid seed treatments they could use.

Some thought they could use 50 per cent, while others thought neonics had been banned altogether. Read more

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Soybean Storage and Conditioning


Now that your crops are in the bin, it’s important to learn how to keep them conditioned and stored properly.
Throughout the winter months it’s important to monitor your soybean temperature, and to aerate your bins.
If you haven’t sold any beans then coring out your bin can be an option to remove some fines, and help stir the grain a bit.
It is important to make sure that soybeans are stored at a 14% moisture or lower. Don’t assume that because your beans went into the bin really dry, you don’t have to aerate. Those low moisture beans are still hot and need to have the field heat removed. Read more

Intensive Zone Soil Sampling

The dirt on soil tests

With soil nutrient levels dropping, how do you need to change your soil-testing program and fertility rates?

By

Fewer farmers are sampling their soils. In Ontario, the numbers say fewer than 30 per cent of farmers test every three years, even though this trend is leading to a data gap at a time when everything else seems to be changing too, such as the rapid climb in yield potentials, and elite corn hybrids that are so much more efficient at extracting nutrients.

Also worrying is that the experts are lining up to tell us that, one way or another, more farmers are mining their soils. Read more