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New forecast points to slow spring next year

CHICAGO, Ill. — Forecasters thought La Nina would be the major weather factor in 2017, but its looking more like La Nada, says Bryce Anderson, DTN’s senior agricultural meteorologist.

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology says the likelihood of a La Nina developing is now low. That viewpoint is shared by the U.S. National Weather Service’s Climate Prediction Center, which is forecasting neutral conditions from January through March.

That opens the door for what Anderson calls the B-team of weather influencers: the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO).

The PDO switched to a negative value in the fall of 2016, while the AMO has been positive since 1998. Read more

Soybean Storage and Conditioning


Now that your crops are in the bin, it’s important to learn how to keep them conditioned and stored properly.
Throughout the winter months it’s important to monitor your soybean temperature, and to aerate your bins.
If you haven’t sold any beans then coring out your bin can be an option to remove some fines, and help stir the grain a bit.
It is important to make sure that soybeans are stored at a 14% moisture or lower. Don’t assume that because your beans went into the bin really dry, you don’t have to aerate. Those low moisture beans are still hot and need to have the field heat removed. Read more

Environment Canada says more humidity to come for June and July

Looking ahead to the coming months, Environment Canada meteorologists expect there will be more heat and humidity than normal.

“We’ve already had a taste this month of temperatures getting close to the 30-degree mark and humidity making it feel more like the mid 30s. That looks like the shape of things to come for June and July,” said Geoff Coulson, a warning preparedness meteorologist with Environment Canada.

Last year the usual summer heat wave to hit southern Ontario was missing in action with a lack of flow of warm moist air from the Gulf of Mexico, Coulson said.

This season southern Ontario has already tapped into that flow from the Gulf a couple of times with Humidex readings in many parts of Southwestern Ontario reaching the mid 30s.