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Is it your intention to apply nitrogen in-crop to your corn?

Your farm has several options to consider utilizing this year:

  • Traditional sidedress 28%, perhaps at knee high corn
  • High clearance 28% application at V6 to V8 leaf stage with your own self-propelled applicator using drag hoses, Y-drops or streamer nozzles, or…

Introducing Thompsons NEW high-clearance RoGator for urea application!

Apply in-crop urea at V6 to V8 leaf stage with a self-propelled custom applicator airflow RoGator, owned and operated by Thompsons Limited.

If you consider the following chart, showing the uptake of nitrogen throughout the corn growing season, a significant portion of the nitrogen requirement occurs from tasseling to physiological maturity (black layer).

An in-season, planned, application of nitrogen allows you to more precisely meet the nitrogen requirements of your corn crop. In addition, we now have the ability to test for soil nitrogen, in field!

Nitrogen Update chart

New for 2016

We now have the ability to test for soil nitrogen, right in the field!

Using Thompsons N-Gauge, our 360 SoilScan unit, we will have nitrate results in minutes.

To make the most out of an in-crop application of 28% or urea, it is strongly recommended that the nitrogen be treated with an inhibitor (Agrotain) that protects the nitrogen from ammonia volatilization, denitrification and nitrate leaching.

Contact your local Thompsons branch today.

Late Application of Nitrogen

Late season nitrogen application

Corn N ChartLate season nitrogen application has been a hot topic amongst farmers and uptake in this practice has increased in recent years. The expense and environmental impact has made growers think differently about nitrogen application.

Weather extremes has also caused growers to change the way they apply nitrogen to litigate loses from excessive rainfall when applying all their nitrogen ahead of planting. Read more

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Nitrogen on winter wheat

Cereals are very responsive to nitrogen. However, over-application of nitrogen causes lodging resulting in reduce yield, quality, and harvestability. The optimum rate of nitrogen for a particular field will depend on the type of wheat grown, past applications of manure or fertilizer, soil type, and crop rotation. Use general recommendations as a starting point but combine them with observation of crop growth and lodging tendency. The idea is to ensure nitrogen is available early and consistently though the major uptake period (node development though booting).

Timing

Time single applications for late April. This avoids significant N loss from wet soil conditions that might occur earlier, while providing N when the crop demand goes up. Large single applications increase lodging potential.

Split application are preferred. The main benefits are reduced concerns over N loss, greater weed control due to increased crop vigor, more uniform heading, and less lodging. Yield benefits are secondary. Apply 50-80 lbs/ac N as early as possible (on frost any time after March 15-20), with the balance at 1st – 2nd node. Nodes can be easily seen or felt on the stem above ground level.

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Fall good time to buy fertilizer

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Farmers are better off buying fertilizer in fall or winter rather than waiting until spring 90 percent of the time, according to Alberta Agriculture.

The department has tracked urea, ammonia and phosphate prices for the past 10 years.

“There has only been one year, and that was in 2008, that spring prices were lower than fall-winter prices,” said Jennifer Stoby, an agricultural input market analyst with Alberta Agriculture.

She encouraged farmers to talk with their retailers this fall about their upcoming needs, especially for nitrogen fertilizers.

“With lower crop prices, guys have been hesitant to buy fertilizer and not really making any decisions,” said Stoby. “If they do wait until spring, there might be some problems actually even getting product.”

Growers who haven’t pre-bought product have faced supply shortages for the last few years, and it could be the same scenario next year.

“Retails aren’t bringing in nearly as much product just to have on hand the same as they have in the past,” said Stoby.

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