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Harvesting Soybeans

Big south american output casting long shadow

Wet weather may be slowing planting in the American Midwest, but the big crops expected in South America this year will continue to overhang the corn and soybean markets, according to a U.S. analyst.

Speaking last week as part of an MGEX-sponsored crop call, Randy Martinson of Martinson Ag Risk Management, admitted the big numbers from South America suggest there’s little reason for Northern Hemisphere producers to expect any kind of significant price rally, especially given the fact the Brazil soybean harvest is now just about wrapped up. Read more

Planting seeds in field photo

Weather uncertainty still supportive for soybeans

U.S. weather uncertainty will continue to be a source of support for downtrodden soybean futures, regardless of rising South American production prospects, according to a U.S. analyst.

“There appears to be a reluctance in getting short before planting and the growing season,” said Sean Lusk of Walsh Trading in Chicago.

Chicago soybean futures actually fell to their lowest level of the past year earlier this week, but bounced off those lows as uncertainty about new-crop production and chart-based buying offered support. As the chart below shows, the May soybean contract fell heavily throughout March, dropping over US$1/bu before showing some mettle on Wednesday and early Thursday. Read more

soybean yield map thumbnail

Maps show average corn and soybean yields

Corn and soybean producers faced dry weather in some areas last summer and yields varied across the province, but where faced low yields, Production Insurance helped out. A couple of areas were affected more severely by the dry weather and experienced yields lower than the historical average. Other parts of the province saw the highest […]

Record harvests of corn and soybeans that fortified bearish arguments in 2016

The big crops keep coming

With 2016 nearly in the history books, it seems fair to say that the year will be remembered for its record corn and soybean harvests. Never before has any country ever produced 15.23 billion bushels of corn or 4.36 bb of soybeans, let alone both in the same season.

Not only was 2016 a year of good harvest, it was the fourth consecutive year of good harvests and, because of that, ending surpluses grew larger. According to USDA, U.S. ending corn stocks will total 2.4 billion bushels in 2016-17 or 16.4% of annual use. That is the highest stocks-to-use ratio in 11 years, an impressive accomplishment that took DTN’s national index of cash corn prices below $3.00 a bushel in the fall to its lowest level in eight years. Read more

Brazil opens two new rail-port grain terminals in north

Source: DTN, Alastair Stewart South America Correspondent

VLI, a Brazilian logistics operator, announced it had opened two new grain terminals in the northern state of Tocantins, continuing the improvement in logistics in Brazil’s expansion regions.

The terminals serve the north-south railroad, also essentially controlled by VLI, on which beans and corn from Maranhao, Tocantins, Piaui, Bahia and eastern Mato Grosso will be transported to the northern port of Itaqui.

The R$264 million ($73 million) investment will increase grain capacity along the north-south route by up to 6 million metric tons (mmt), estimates VLI. Read more

US corn sowings ideas wane, as futures underperform

Investors appear to be trimming expectations for the growth US corn sowings this year, as a key report looms, with futures markets boost the incentive for farmers to raise plantings of rival soybeans.

Rabobank on Thursday forecast a rise of 1m-1.5m acres in US corn plantings, from the 88.4m acres seeded last year.

And separately, US-based Global Commodity Analytics, citing results of a limited farmer survey, pegged seedings at 89.4m acres.

Earlier this week, Societe Generale put corn seedings at 89.0m acres, while Informa Economics on Friady pegged area at 89.5m acres.

Although all these forecasts would see US farmers raise sowings of the grain for the first time in four years, the estimates are below the 90.0m acres at which the US Department of Agriculture pegged seedings in an initial estimate last month.

An Allendale report last week did come in with a more upbeat estimate for corn sowings, of 90.4m acres. Read more

All that confusion on seed treatments

Some implications of Ontario’s new neonic regulations are stunning.

By Ralph PearceCountry Guide, Production Editor

As the calendar has turned to a new year, the news from seed and chemical companies is that there is considerable confusion about seed-applied treatments. Growers, they’re finding, have been left with a mixed bag of information about the options available to them, much of which is flat out wrong.

Some growers believed they had no seed-applied options at all, while others were confused about the levels of neonicotinoid seed treatments they could use.

Some thought they could use 50 per cent, while others thought neonics had been banned altogether. Read more

Soybean Storage and Conditioning


Now that your crops are in the bin, it’s important to learn how to keep them conditioned and stored properly.
Throughout the winter months it’s important to monitor your soybean temperature, and to aerate your bins.
If you haven’t sold any beans then coring out your bin can be an option to remove some fines, and help stir the grain a bit.
It is important to make sure that soybeans are stored at a 14% moisture or lower. Don’t assume that because your beans went into the bin really dry, you don’t have to aerate. Those low moisture beans are still hot and need to have the field heat removed. Read more

Course to certify Ontario producers for class 12 pesticides

By Owen Roberts, 

A free half-day course is being offered to help Ontario farmers become certified for buying and using grain corn and soybean seed treated with Class 12 pesticides (imidacloprid, clothianidin or thiamethoxam), popularly called neonicotinoids.

The course, called the Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Course for Corn and Soybeans, is being made available through the University of Guelph’s Ridgetown campus and sponsored by the province.

As of next Aug. 31, buying and using neonicotinoid-treated corn or soybean seed will only be possible with training and certification. Certification is valid for five years. Up to seven people can be supervised to plant under this certification.

Participants will learn IPM principles (including corn and soybean pest identification), planting best management practices, the new regulatory requirements regarding Class 12 pesticides and pollinator protection from neonicotinoid exposure.

“The aim of this course is for farmers to further understand how to apply [integrated pest management] concepts to their own corn and soybean fields, specifically for the early season pests,” says Wentworth County farmer and Ontario Federation of Agriculture director Drew Spoelstra. “They’ll learn how to look for these pests on their farms and consider all the options for managing them.”

The in-class course starts Nov. 3 in Ridgetown. It will be followed by sessions in Woodstock, Verner, Simcoe, Elora, Wyoming, Winchester, Harrow, Clinton, Lindsay and Vineland Station. Participants can sign up for these and other courses at www.ipmcertified.ca or by calling 1-866-225-9020.

The online course also starts Nov. 3. It requires four hours of commitment over two days. High-speed internet and computer competency are required.

There are no requirements for using non-treated seed or fungicide-only treated seed. Class 12 pesticides do not include seed for popping corn, sweet corn, or corn used for the production for seed (seed corn) or soybean seed grown for certified status in accordance with a seed production contract (seed soybeans).


Source: FCC Express, October 2, 2015