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All that confusion on seed treatments

Some implications of Ontario’s new neonic regulations are stunning.

By Ralph PearceCountry Guide, Production Editor

As the calendar has turned to a new year, the news from seed and chemical companies is that there is considerable confusion about seed-applied treatments. Growers, they’re finding, have been left with a mixed bag of information about the options available to them, much of which is flat out wrong.

Some growers believed they had no seed-applied options at all, while others were confused about the levels of neonicotinoid seed treatments they could use.

Some thought they could use 50 per cent, while others thought neonics had been banned altogether. Read more

students learning

Course to certify Ontario producers for class 12 pesticides

By Owen Roberts, 

A free half-day course is being offered to help Ontario farmers become certified for buying and using grain corn and soybean seed treated with Class 12 pesticides (imidacloprid, clothianidin or thiamethoxam), popularly called neonicotinoids.

The course, called the Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Course for Corn and Soybeans, is being made available through the University of Guelph’s Ridgetown campus and sponsored by the province.

As of next Aug. 31, buying and using neonicotinoid-treated corn or soybean seed will only be possible with training and certification. Certification is valid for five years. Up to seven people can be supervised to plant under this certification.

Participants will learn IPM principles (including corn and soybean pest identification), planting best management practices, the new regulatory requirements regarding Class 12 pesticides and pollinator protection from neonicotinoid exposure.

“The aim of this course is for farmers to further understand how to apply [integrated pest management] concepts to their own corn and soybean fields, specifically for the early season pests,” says Wentworth County farmer and Ontario Federation of Agriculture director Drew Spoelstra. “They’ll learn how to look for these pests on their farms and consider all the options for managing them.”

The in-class course starts Nov. 3 in Ridgetown. It will be followed by sessions in Woodstock, Verner, Simcoe, Elora, Wyoming, Winchester, Harrow, Clinton, Lindsay and Vineland Station. Participants can sign up for these and other courses at www.ipmcertified.ca or by calling 1-866-225-9020.

The online course also starts Nov. 3. It requires four hours of commitment over two days. High-speed internet and computer competency are required.

There are no requirements for using non-treated seed or fungicide-only treated seed. Class 12 pesticides do not include seed for popping corn, sweet corn, or corn used for the production for seed (seed corn) or soybean seed grown for certified status in accordance with a seed production contract (seed soybeans).


Source: FCC Express, October 2, 2015

Bins-and-VBox

Keep treated seed and contaminants out of our food chain

With harvest upon us, we want to remind all Thompsons customers that we have a zero tolerance for treated seed or contaminants in ANY load of beans, grains, corn and edible beans coming into our facilities.

WARNING:

Zero tolerance for TREATED SEED occurring in grains, soybeans, corn and edible beans.

Make sure all equipment is thoroughly cleaned and inspected before using it for grain.

Under the Canada Grain Act:

A licensed grain handling facility, such as a licensed primary elevator, cannot:

TreatedSeedStickersReceive grain that is contaminated with treated seed or suspected to be contaminated or ship grain that is contaminated with treated seed or suspected to be contaminated.

A producer (or a person acting on a producer’s behalf) cannot deliver grain to a licensed facility that is contaminated with treated seed or suspected to be contaminated.

“It is unlawful to deliver grain that has been treated or infected with any poisonous substance or compound to this Elevator. Persons so charged will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law and held liable for any expense or loss incurred in the removal and disposition of grains so contaminated.”